IMA Awards

Archived material.  As of August 2002, Trond Schumacher [<trond.schumacher@bio.uio.no> or <trondsc@darwin.uio.no>] became president of IMA



On the occasion of the silver anniversary of the International Mycological Association, two silver medals were established by the Officers and Executive Committee: the Ainsworth Medal in recognition of extraordinary service to world mycology and the de Bary Medal in recognition of lifetime research contributions to mycology. The Ainsworth Medal rewards service to world mycology, especially through the International Mycological Association. In addition it commemorates Dr.Geoffrey C. Ainsworth, who conceived the idea of an international association to foster cooperation in mycological research and education throughout the world and who was instrumental in the organization of the first International Mycological Congress in 1971. The medal for lifetime research achievements is named for Anton de Bary, who not only began a modern era in fungal research, but also was responsible for training students from throughout the world to disseminate mycological knowledge broadly.

The first Ainsworth and de Bary Medals were presented at a meeting held in Sheffield in April 1996 on the occasion of the Centenary of the British Mycological Society to recognize the unique contribution that British mycologists have made to their science. Professor John Webster, who has distinguished himself in teaching and research, was recognized for his contributions to the organization of IMA by award of the Ainsworth Medal. de Bary Medals were presented to Professor E. J. H. Corner (d. 1996) and Professor C. T. Ingold, both of whom have a long records of outstanding accomplishment in research.

The original design and fabrication of the medals was the work of Barbara Minor and Christopher A. Hentz, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The design depicts a germ tube emerging from and encircling a reticulate spore and terminating in the production of asexual spores. The spore shape and ornamentation was chosen because it is a common form found in many groups of organisms studied by mycologists. On a different level it may be seen to symbolize mycological knowledge encircling the earth, poised for dissemination. The design, crafted in silver, overlays an engraved bronze base. The design is the basis of an emblem that will be used to represent IMA.
 



 
 

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